Constitution

 

Constitution of the United Buddhist Nations Organization (UBNO)

 

Preamble

On October 10th, 2016, it was the United Buddhist Nations Organization (UBNO), inspired by the integrative and reconciling pathway of Master Siddharta Gautama, promoting the development of Buddha-Dharma-Sangha and strengthening the spiritual legacy of the Buddhist Civilization with the determination to ensure the respect and fulfillment of individual and collective Human Rights of the Spiritual Communities and Buddhist Peoples. This deep understanding of politics, economy, culture and environment of the Buddhist Nation will motivate future generations to bring forth a better world, converting Liberation into a lifestyle. The Buddhist Commune (Sangha) has a duty to ethically and spiritually lead the international community, making a vital contribution to solve the problems and challenges with which humanity is faced in order to survive.

That is why we, the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities of the world, are solemnly committed to:

Seeking the Salvation of humanity, to promote the fulfillment of Human Rights and to preserve the dignity of all forms of life, including Mother Earth, which is a Purpose (Dharma) that is seriously threatened by the self-destructive direction of contemporary civilization;

Taking the necessary actions for the non-violent defense of all living beings, especially prioritizing the obligations established in the Universal Declaration on the Rights of Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities, which is complemented by the Universal Declaration of Spiritual Rights, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Universal Declaration on the Right to World Peace, the Universal Declaration on the Rights of Non-Human Beings, the Universal Declaration on the Right to Inter-religious and Inter-Spiritual Harmony, and the Universal Declaration on Buddhism as Cultural Heritage of Humanity;

Assuming responsibility at an international level for doing good, to avoid evil and to purify the internal and external world, preserving humanity, nature and spiritual values;

Cooperating to protect the resources of Mother Earth, such as the Biosphere and Atmosphere, seeking to abolish overexploitation and depredation of natural resources;

Ensuring compliance with Human Rights in accordance with the treaties, conventions and declarations established;

Promoting International Law as a form of conflict resolution;

Working in pursue of the demilitarization and disarmament of all nations of the world, especially to prevent the construction and use of nuclear, chemical, biological and climatic weapons;

Judging all genocides, ethnic cleansings, crimes against humanity, war crimes and ecocides committed by all the countries of the world, especially if they are powers with the capability of committing such acts with impunity;

Prohibiting military aggressions and economic coercions that undermine the sovereignty and territory of the States;

Protecting the supreme human right to peace of all Nations, especially the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities that have turned peace into the very reason for their existence;

Proscribing war and warmongering as illegal forms of conflict resolution, giving the order to dismantle military bases throughout the world;

Guaranteeing compliance with international judgments and norms that must be consistent with the goal of world peace;

Eradicating poverty and social injustice, promoting that all Nations are assured of daily food for their subsistence, especially the Indigenous Peoples who have been marginalized from society and also the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities that depend on donations to survive;

Positioning solidarity and spiritual love as the path and horizon from which the great human family must be developed, living in harmony, cooperation and fraternity with the rest of the species of Mother Earth;

Consequently, the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities subscribe to the present Charter of the United Buddhist Nations Organization:

 

Part I: Purposes

Article 1 – The Purpose (Dharma) of the United Buddhist Nations Organization is to support and defend both the Human Rights of Buddhist individuals and the Human Rights of Buddhist Communities (Sanghas), facilitating and collaborating with the transmission of knowledge of Spiritual Ethics and International Law in pursuit of the construction of a civilization of world peace, social justice, free education and ecological harmony.

Article 2 – The Purpose (Dharma) of the United Buddhist Nations Organization is to act both for the benefit of the Spiritual Communities and Buddhist Peoples as well as for the benefit of the entire humanity, providing an international legal framework that unites East and West within a global association of brotherhood, where members collaborate and support each other, sharing their knowledges and practices.

Article 3 – The Purpose (Dharma) of the United Buddhist Nations Organization is to maintain world peace and international justice by promoting collective measures to effectively prevent and eliminate war and violence as threats to the human right to peace. This resolution of conflicts must be achieved through non-violent means and in accordance with the principles of Buddhist Ethics and Law.

Article 4 – The Purpose (Dharma) of the United Buddhist Nations Organization is to eradicate nationalism and imperialism, as well as populism and terrorism, and consider them as extremes that undermine the sovereignty and cooperation of members of the international community. It should be promoted attachment to the rule of Law and Righteousness in local and international relations, not allowing impunity when these principles are violated, especially in cases involving Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

Article 5 – The Purpose (Dharma) of the United Buddhist Nations Organization is to banish all forms of war, including those carried out in the name of humanitarianism and freedom, which constitutes a perverse attack on the supreme human right to peace. For this reason, it will be a fundamental activity to denounce those who carry out warlike activities, especially when the victims are Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

Article 6 – The Purpose (Dharma) of the United Buddhist Nations Organization is to synthesize the ethical strength, universal determination and social responsibility of all Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities, teaching a spirit of equanimity and tolerance facing the psychological, philosophical and political differences. No voice that promotes the common good of humanity and nature should be excluded.

Article 7 – The Purpose (Dharma) of the United Buddhist Nations Organization is to abolish the materialist empire of war, poverty, ignorance and pollution. The political diversity, economic well-being, cultural wealth and environmental health of the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities should be protected.

Article 8 – The Purpose (Dharma) of the United Buddhist Nations Organization is to convey the voice of the poor and marginalized, such as the Buddhist Peoples and the Spiritual Communities, facing the omnipotent voice of the rich and powerful.

Article 9 – The Purpose (Dharma) of the United Buddhist Nations Organization is to promote relations of friendship and mutual support among countries as well as between Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities, respecting differences and self-determination.

Article 10 – The Purpose (Dharma) of the United Buddhist Nations Organization is to cooperate with the international community in order to solve the world’s political, economic, cultural and environmental problems, in particular by promoting the development of fundamental freedoms and human rights of Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

Article 11 – The Purpose (Dharma) of the United Buddhist Nations Organization is to disseminate free studies in Buddhist Law and Human Rights.

 

Part II: Principles

Article 12 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on principles of independence, sovereignty, autonomy and self-determination of the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities with respect to the States in which they live.

Article 13 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principles of solidarity and love of the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities toward living beings and Mother Earth.

Article 14 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of peaceful struggle against imperialism, both in the relationship of powerful countries with respect to oppressed countries, as well as in the relationship of the State with Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

Article 15 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of ensuring the fulfillment of the individual and collective rights of the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

Article 16 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of peaceful settlement of disputes, so that States do not jeopardize the supreme human right to peace of the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities, and vice versa.

Article 17 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that all States refrain from threatening or violating the political independence, economic integrity, cultural sovereignty and environmental health of the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

Article 18 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that all States refrain from using armaments or intelligence services to break the autonomy of Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

Article 19 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that the legitimacy of all Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities implies that they do not support any kind of military activity.

Article 20 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of being an ethical alternative to the leadership of the UN.

Article 21 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that, in case the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities support a State violating Human Rights and International Law, they should be ethically condemned as spiritually fraudulent and illegal organizations, since such situation would be a lack of respect for the spirit of Buddhist Ethics and Law.

Article 22 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that, in case the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities promote violence at the local or international level, they will be termed as terrorist organizations.

Article 23 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities have a sacred duty to protect present and future generations, caring for the welfare of all living beings, including unwavering respect and peaceful coexistence with Mother Earth.

Article 24 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities have the duty of sustainable development, respecting the natural cycles of Mother Earth.

Article 25 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities should work in pursue of the universal goal of world peace, social justice, advanced education and ecological harmony.

Article 26 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities should support or being part of movements against the proliferation of nuclear bombs and other weapons of mass destruction.

Article 27 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities must maintain their jurisdictions and autonomy inviolable, with the exception of cases of human rights violations.

Article 28 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that the occupation of territories and the control of States on internal affairs of the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities are contrary to the maintenance of international peace and justice.

Article 29 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that colonization is illegal, so any illegitimate occupation of territories must be returned to its original inhabitants, especially if those affected are Tribal Peoples, Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

Article 30 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that every crime or violation of the human rights and fundamental freedoms of Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities is jurisdiction and responsibility of the International Buddhist Ethics Committee & Buddhist Tribunal on Human Rights.

Article 31 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of promoting ethical judgments against countries that violate International Law, with emphasis on those who systematically resort to war, which is the violation of the supreme human right to peace.

Article 32 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of denouncing organizations and companies that support warlike actions, including those that do it in the name of humanitarianism.

Article 33 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that the pacification of the world is an essential and undelayable goal, so that Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities must also renounce the right to self-defense through violent means, assuming the duty to collective and individual self-defense only by peaceful, ethical and legal means.

Article 34 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of peaceful purposes that are undoubtedly opposed to the warmongering superpowers governing the UN, which act outside the international law framework.

Article 35 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of forming an intergovernmental network between different Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities whose communal or tribal governments must be recognized by the States.

Article 36 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that non-governmental organizations at the international level constitute the great effort of humanity to build a better world by carrying out tasks that contribute to the awakening of the international community in order to solve crises threatening the life of humanity and Mother Earth.

Article 37 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of recognition that Tribal Peoples, Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities seem to be the only human beings in maintaining relationships of respect and harmony with nature as a lifestyle.

Article 38 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of forming links with other international institutions, especially those representing Human Rights activists, Tribal Peoples and Universities, which may have observer member status within the organization.

Article 39 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of declaring the UN’s Responsibility to Protect as a perverse and imperialist mechanism that disguises itself as humanitarianism to perpetrate acts of war that violate the aim of world peace.

Article 40 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle that no State should deny self-determination of Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

Article 41 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of promoting liberty, equality and fraternity.

Article 42 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of respect for the development of politics, economy, culture and environment of the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

Article 43 – The United Buddhist Nations Organization is based on the principle of cooperation with States for the sake of self-determination and sovereignty of Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

 

Part III: Membership

Article 44 – Those who participated in the ceremony held by the World Association of Theravada on October 10, 2016, where the historic Universal Declaration on the Rights of Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities was made known, are Founding Members of the United Buddhist Nations Organization.

Article 45 – All Buddhist institutions that are in accordance with this Constitution and also with the Universal Declaration on the Rights of Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities are Institutional Members of the United Buddhist Nations Organization.

Article 46 – All those who follow the path of peace that this Constitution implies are Institutional Members of the United Buddhist Nations Organization.

Article 47 – All those who have been accepted by the Presidency of the Governing Council are Institutional Members of the United Buddhist Nations Organization.

Article 48 – All those who engage in violent activities that systematically violate the Purposes and Principles of the United Buddhist Nations Organization will be expelled or suspended from Institutional Membership.

Article 49 – All those who have had inappropriate behavior or have been sentenced by the International Buddhist Ethics Committee & Buddhist Tribunal on Human Rights will be expelled or suspended from Institutional Membership of the United Buddhist Nations Organization.

 

Part IV: International Treaty of Friendship and Mutual Support

Article 50 – The participating members reaffirm their desire for the creation of a world-wide peace system in the world with the active participation of all Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities, whose autonomy and independence is fundamental in order to combine the efforts that ensure international justice.

Article 51 – The participating members consider that the contemporary world situation plagued by wars and injustices is the result of the main international organizations’ failures to create a world without warmongering and impunity, which shows the need to create a new international organization capable of defending the individual and collective Human Rights of the Buddhist Nation and of all humanity.

Article 52 – The participating members are convinced that under these social circumstances the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities must unite and adopt the necessary measures to safeguard their lifestyle and Purpose of peace in the world.

Article 53 – The participating members are guided by the ethical and legal principles established by Master Siddharta Gautama and also by the United Buddhist Nations Organization with the Universal Declaration on the Rights of Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

Article 54 – The participating members are in accordance with the interests of strengthening and promoting cultural cooperation and environmental assistance, respecting the self-determination of Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities before the States, which must follow the principle of non-interference in the internal affairs of the Buddhist Nation.

Article 55 – The participating members declare the signing and ratification of the Universal Declaration on the Rights of Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities, sincerely supporting the pursuit of international cooperation to vigorously defend the goals of worldwide peacekeeping and the fulfillment of the Human Rights of the Buddhist Nation.

Article 56 – The participating members should support the worldwide approval and spreading of the Universal Declaration on Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities to all Buddhist institutions and to all States of the world, seeking international agreements that will benefit the Buddhist Nation.

Article 57 – The participating members agree to abide by this Constitution, refraining from using any type of violence and seeking to resolve local and international conflicts through peaceful means.

Article 58 – The participating members are against the existence of all kinds of weapons, especially weapons of mass destruction, banning the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities to support violent activities.

Article 59 – The participating members should show solidarity with other members of the United Buddhist Nations Organization in cases of violations of human rights, by supporting the maintenance of peace and security in their territories and institutions.

Article 60 – The participating members, in the event of an attack against a member of the United Buddhist Nations Organization, should regard it as an attack on themselves, seeking to restore peace of the affected Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

Article 61 – The participating members may consult at any time with the Presidency of the United Buddhist Nations Organization on the implications of this Constitution.

Article 62 – The participating members will have the possibility to propose an individual member within the Governing Council of the United Buddhist Nations Organization.

Article 63 – The participating members agree not to get involved with any organization that is contrary to World Peace, International Justice, Buddhist Ethics and Human Rights.

Article 64 – The participating members state that they will always act with a spirit of friendship and mutual support with the Purpose (Dharma) of cooperating with the international community in establishing political, economic, cultural and environmental relations that will benefit the Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities on the basis of respect for their independence and sovereignty.

Article 65 – The participating members affirm that the establishment of this International Treaty will be effective upon ratification by the Governing Council of the United Buddhist Nations Organization, confirming that this International Treaty will not expire.

Article 66 – The participating members accept that the United Buddhist Nations Organization raises both the Asian Buddhist Flag as well as the Flag of the original peoples of America.

Article 67 – The participating members recommend that the United Buddhist Nations Organization establishes headquarters and offices all over the continents, showing the internationalist spirit of the organization.

Article 68 – The participating members accept that the Constitution enters into force after the approval of the majority of members of the Governing Council, and it must be published and spread in the two main international languages: English and Spanish.

 

Part IV: Governing Council

Article 69 – It is established that memberships within the United Buddhist Nations Organization (UBNO) are free, so that all administrative expenses must be covered by the regent founding members of the organization, such as Maitriyana Buddhist University or the International Buddhist Ethics Committee & Buddhist Tribunal on Human Rights, which are institutions validated or legitimized by the United Buddhist Nations Organizations (UBNO).

Article 70 – The Governing Council is established as the principal organ of the United Buddhist Nations Organization, being able to perform functions of Peace Council and Buddhist Court.

Article 71 – Equity is set between men and women when deciding the composition of the representatives that form the governing organs, since men and women will have the same rights within the United Buddhist Nations Organization (UBNO).

Article 72 – It is established that the governing organs of the United Buddhist Nations Organization should enjoy, at all times and in all places, the juridical capacity and privileges of immunity which are necessary to carry out their purposes, principles and functions.

 

Article 73 – The Governing Council of the United Buddhist Nations Organization (UBNO) shall, at least once a year, hold a democratic voting about the membership, activities and projects carried out by the organization.

Article 74 – The Governing Council will be composed of a President, a Vice President, an Executive Secretary, Ambassadors and Councilors, who will be elected for a term of 10 years.

Article 75 – The President of the Governing Council is the highest ranking official of the United Buddhist Nations Organization, having the role of representing the organization throughout the world and having also the role of being the spiritual guide who writes the main Declarations of the organization.

Article 76 – The Governing Council shall be composed of representatives from all Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities who have signed both the Universal Declaration on the Rights of Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities as well as this Constitution, and they have the right to nominate an individual member within the Governing Council.

Article 77 – The Governing Council will be able to discuss any matter within the limits and functions of the United Buddhist Nations Organization, and shall meet whenever necessary to carry out its work.

Article 78 – The Governing Council may consider the principles of international Human Rights instruments approved in pursue of maintaining world peace, although it will be able to approve its own Declarations as well.

Article 79 – The President of the Governing Council shall be at the disposal of the members of the United Buddhist Nations Organization for the peaceful resolution of any kind of internal and external conflicts they might have.

Article 80 – The Governing Council shall defend and protect the members of the United Buddhist Nations Organization facing attacks or violations of their supreme human right to peace.

Article 81 – The Governing Council should criticize those States that do not comply with international resolutions and judgments.

Article 82 – The Governing Council may discuss matters relating to admission of new institutional members of the United Buddhist Nations Organization, expulsion of members, restoration of membership, amendments to this Constitution, election of new members of the Governing Council, election of the President of the Governing Council, the maintenance of international peace and justice, the Peace Council and the Buddhist Court.

Article 83 – The Governing Council shall not receive remuneration for its functions.

Article 84 – The Governing Council, together with the other organs of the United Buddhist Nations Organization, may not receive instructions from any government or authority that is outside the organization, otherwise it would be an act of treason against Buddhist Peoples and Spiritual Communities.

Article 85 – The Governing Council will evaluate cases of treason against the United Buddhist Nations Organization, having the duty to proceed to expel any member who commits such acts.

Article 86 – The Governing Council, especially its President, undertakes to respect the internationalist character of the United Buddhist Nations Organization, by not allowing the influence of nationalist and colonialist visions within the organization.

Article 87 – The Governing Council, especially its President, must have diplomatic status in its relations with States of the world, reason by which the representatives of the United Buddhist Nations Organization in certain countries will function as de facto Ambassadors.

Article 88 – The Governing Council, especially its President, will be capable of making constitutional amendments or create Buddhist Councils provided that they are not refuted by a majority of members.

 

Constitution updated to October 10, 2017